Return to Mobile Site

Alerts

We provide businesses and public agencies with quick updates on legal developments as they happen. These alerts are handy reference guides for staying abreast of current issues impacting your organization.

April 3, 2017

The Ninth Circuit Reiterates Procedural Requirements, Warns Against ALJ’s Reframing of Hearing Issues, and Identifies Consequences for a School District’s Failure to Timely Respond to Due Process Complaints

On March 27, 2017, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued a decision in M.C. v. Antelope Valley Union High School District that touches on several issues significant to special education practice and procedures.

more

March 21, 2017

California Court of Appeal Concludes That Commissioned Employees are Entitled to Separately Compensated Rest Breaks

Does California law require that an employee who is paid on a commission basis receive separate compensation for his or her rest periods?

more

March 10, 2017

Stopping Scammers from Phishing HR and Payroll Personnel for W-2s and Other Private Employee Data

Nothing is certain except death and taxes—and phishing scams every tax season. "Phishing" is defined as identity theft taking place over the Internet. According to the IRS, phishing and malware incidents rose 400 percent in the 2016 tax season. Based on recent IRS alerts, these incidents have not diminished in the 2017 tax season. Both this year and last year, the IRS has discovered phishing schemes targeting tax professionals, payroll workers, human resources personnel, schools, individual taxpayers, and more.

more

March 3, 2017

California Supreme Court Holds Public Records Sent Through Private Email Accounts and Devices May Be Subject to Disclosure

In a much-anticipated decision, the California Supreme Court held on March 2, 2017, that when a public employee uses a personal account or device to communicate about the conduct of public business, the writings may be subject to disclosure under the California Public Records Act (CPRA). (City of San Jose v. Superior Court of Santa Clara County (2017) Case No. S218066.)

more

March 3, 2017

California Supreme Court Holds Public Records Sent Through Private Email Accounts and Devices May Be Subject to Disclosure

In a much-anticipated decision, the California Supreme Court held on March 2, 2017, that when a public employee uses a personal account or device to communicate about the conduct of public business, the writings may be subject to disclosure under the California Public Records Act (CPRA). (City of San Jose v. Superior Court of Santa Clara County (2017) Case No. S218066.)

more

March 1, 2017

California Adopts Game-Changing Public Works Claims Legislation

California contractors and public agencies are undoubtedly familiar with the intricate claims presentation requirements that have become commonplace in public works contracts. Public owners have generally been free to develop their own individualized construction contracts. Like the proverbial snowflake, no two public works contracts are exactly alike. Each typically contains a different contractual claims provision which may vary greatly from the next in terms of the levels of dispute resolution required, the documentation public works contractors are required to submit, the time requirements for submission of claims, and other requirements. At times, the contractual claims process can present a trap for the unwary contractor in that the failure to exhaust the contractual procedures may result in a forfeiture of the contractor’s right to pursue its claim in court.

more

March 1, 2017

California Landlord-Tenant Law is Crawling with New Statutes About Bed Bugs

Although bed bugs are small and do not transmit diseases, they can cause giant problems. Their bites can cause severe allergic reactions and secondary skin infections and their presence can lead to significant economic consequences, as well as mental health problems for people residing in infested places.

more

February 10, 2017

The Deadline for Establishing Groundwater Sustainability Agencies Is June 30, 2017

As California experienced its worst-ever drought, at its disposal were outdated water laws, many of which were enacted over a century ago when California had only 3 million residents. In 2014, the state legislature, recognizing the immense value of water as a public resource and the huge detriments of water scarcity, revolutionized California’s water laws. The new, extensive legislation authorizes local control of water basins and requires long-range planning to battle drought conditions.

more

Search Publications By:

Search